Monday, November 13, 2017

Hampton Fall Fling 2017

By Steve Lovshin
November 4-5 Hampton, VA

What a Fling! HYC provided 2 days of great Hampton Flats sailing for one last kick at the cans for 2017.  Nine boats assembled and were greeted with 10-14 knot flat water wire reaching conditions. 6 races were completed on Saturday.  Local (I’m on-call) Tyler Moore found some time to scout the fleet and provided some constructive feedback at the local hot dog stand post racing. The first four races allowed for great wire reaching and defensive battles throughout the fleet with minimal wind shifts. Races 5-6 provided slight changes to the conditions which began to shake the positioning of fleet. Brendan & Patrick, Steve & Henry, and Dr. Crash secured the victories for the day. One notable spill, a few gear breakdowns, crab pot pulling, and some spectacular body drags highlighted the post-race debrief which was carried to over to the annual Oyster Roast with all the great food accompanying it.



Sunday’s conditions changed to light wind, strong tide/current and shifty. We also added a youth team (12&14-year-old) to the fleet. Race 1 – The young kids upset some very good sailors (names purposely forgotten) at the first mark and stayed competitive to finish the first race. Race 2 saw tight action with Wicked Pissa & Team Trouble in the mix throughout helping to create some very competitive situations. Brendan & Patrick and local flyboy Clark Hayes and crew worked their magic to hear the mighty cannon roar for their fine first place finishes in the two races on the day.

HYC Fall Fling Champs 

1. 7606 Brendan Connell & Patrick O’Bryan
2. 9041 Steve & Henry – Henry Amthor & Steve Lovshin
3. 8939 Clark Hayes & crew 1 & crew 2

Notable Observations 

6.5 of the 9 boats sailed by out of towners
3.5 boats from Canada
2 from Annapolis
1 from North Carolina
2 father & son teams

A big shout out to local HYC 505 fleet boat providers

Results found here: 
http://www.regattanetwork.com/event/15618#_newsroom

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Fresh Faces Breaking Boundaries

Kaila Pfrang and Anna Patterson
One of the most exciting stories from Annapolis was that of Kaila Pfrang and Anna Patterson. For a young team, they had some of the best chemistry and work ethic of any other 505 team. They were also one of the few all-female teams on the water. In the Worlds where Angela Stenger and Nikola Birkner became the first all-female team to win a race and break into the top 10, you can see a trend emerging. These are two dedicated, hard-working individuals that will be making waves in their 505 careers. Anna is studying at CNU and Kaila studying at MIT; both are sailing for their respective college teams. I got to know them a little better and learn a bit about the the passion they share for the sport.

How long have you known each other and how long have you sailed together?
Anna: Kaila and I met in high school when I was a freshman, but we didn’t become close friends until after a summer of sailing for the HYC c420 team. We really bonded after sailing a summer regatta together where we capsized for about 40 minutes, but were determined to get the boat up on our own. We ended up finishing the race smiling, laughing, and singing and we’ve been inseparable ever since. After my knee injury the following year, Kaila got into skippering and I focused more on high school racing. We took every opportunity in high school to go sailing together, but now that we go to schools in different states and have college sailing in our schedules our regattas together are pretty limited.
Kaila: I met Anna my very first regatta in high school sailing when my skipper introduced me to her. After that we said hello and chatted briefly over the school year before discovering we’d be on the same race team that summer. We sailed together for one regatta that summer after Anna taught me how to trapeze and sail the spinnaker. After that we went our separate ways both deciding we loved to skipper until I asked Anna to crew for me for a 505 regatta in North Carolina last summer.

How did you get started in the 505?
Anna: Last summer, a week before I was supposed to go to college, Kaila asked me to come sail a 505 regatta in Wrightsville Beach. I figured it would be a fun last weekend together and a good experience, so I agreed. I had a good amount of c420 crew experience, but my first time on a 505 was on our sail out to the race course. The waves were absolutely massive and it was blowing 20-25 kts. It was mildly terrifying and I ended up with a splint on my hand after the spinnaker pole snapped back on it, but I was hooked.
Kaila: Tyler Moore approaches me one day about a 505 left at HYC for a few years. He suggested I take a look and see what I might be able to fix. He was very generous in giving me advice and parts and his workshop for space before I finally took it out with a teammate. After our first day out, I was hooked. I sailed a few local regattas with the lindsay blue boat with my c420 teammate before deciding I wanted to stick with the class full time.

You both sail in college.  How does your college experience help you in the 505?
Anna: Sailing in college is so different from 505 sailing in most ways, but college has helped me the most with mentally working through tactics and boat interactions. College is such a short course in comparison to the several miles you find on a Worlds course, so everything is on a much larger scale. The combination of college regattas keeping us out on the water all day and our strength and conditioning program has definitely helped with the physical and endurance aspects of the 505.
Kaila: The boat handling and practicing with short/tight courses in college sailing translates well into the 5O5 racing in regards to making gains quickly and whether possible. Yet also, while sailing in the notably shiftly Charles River, I have learned a great deal about shifts and keeping the boat flat even through fluke puffs.

What do you like about the 505?
Anna: The 505 community has been absolutely remarkable. Everyone is very supportive. From lending us a boat (Thanks, Tyler!) to coming up to us at Worlds and offering us a sail (Thank you, Doug!) to constant coaching (Thanks Uncle Henry, Mark, and everyone else), everyone seems to do whatever they can to help us learn about the boat and the class. The physical, mental, and emotional challenge of it is also a huge drawing aspect for me. The high pace of these boats gives me an adrenaline rush that is the best feeling in the world to me.
Kaila: Everything. I love the design of the boat (when it isn’t rigged too complicated) and especially the speed and planing ability of the boat. But even more important than the hull shape and racing action, the people in the class make the boat incredible to race. Between the eagerness to help each other and answer questions makes the learning and competing more exciting and friendly. Beyond that though, the 5O5 provides a multitude of invigorating challenges which makes practicing and planing in 8 knots of wind or reaching with the spinnaker in 20 knots something to feel alive for.

What does a typical practice day look like?
Anna: We honestly don’t get out on the water together as much as either of us likes to. We both worked two jobs this summer and then we left for school. When we did manage to get out on the water, most of the time it was without the HYC group. In this case we did a lot of long upwinds and downwinds just trying to nail down our boat handling. If we can’t find a time to sail together, we try to get on the water with other people from HYC and learn as much as we can.
Kaila: Lots of tacks and jibes, acceleration drills, testing new things out. If we have a group we’ll do some speed tests and rabbit drills.

The 505 has a very large sail plan.  Do you find the power intimidating?
Anna: People are shocked that we are sailing the boat, especially together, because of our size and I think this only drives us more. As the crew, it can get pretty intimidating in high winds. I struggle with getting out on the wire in big breeze, specifically on port tack, because of a very messed up left knee and this always proves to make things interesting. I can only push out using my right leg, so the power of the boat in heavy air is the most intimidating to me in this aspect.
Kaila: It’s exhilarating, but sometimes when I want to go slow it’s definitely a bit intimidating how large the sail is and how fast the boat always goes. Learning how to utilize the sail plan while keeping the boat flat and fast often proves difficult; yet, as a naturally fast-paced person, I find the power and speed of the boat overall exciting.

Your best finish was a respectable 23.  Do you remember what you did to get it right?
Anna: Our first couple races we really struggled with the large fleet rabbit starts and getting out of the short course mindset. We learned a lot from every race and were working constantly to improve our straight line boat speed. We quickly realized that we lost a lot in maneuvers and we worked on doing what we could to fix that. For me, it was keeping Kaila focused on racing our race and focusing on all of my boat handling and wire work.
Kaila: After a few difficult starts of the day our goal was to have one good one and after taking Mark Zagol’s advice about setting up and rig tune off the line, we prepared ourselves. Yet, to be completely honest, I right after the start, I really really badly had to go to the bathroom so my mindset the entire race was to have the fastest boat speed to finish quickly and well. We focused greatly on boat speed and clear air throughout the entire race. After having a decent start, keeping clear was made a bit easier as we worked on maintaining the position.

Kaila and Anna leading a pack around the top mark
Do you have any role models you look up to?
Anna: My family has had such a huge impact on my sailing. My mom has constantly pushed me to not be limited by any health setbacks, including two surgeries on one knee before the age of 17. She has advocated for me endlessly and I cannot thank her enough for her support. Kaila is definitely one of the biggest role models in my life. She is ultimately family to me and I am constantly in awe of her intelligence, dedication, and passion. Also, a quick shout out goes to my coaches, boss, captains, and teammates over the past years who have proved to be some of the most influential people in my life.
Kaila: I would say regarding sailing I have three specific role models. My father is one of my biggest when it comes to staying positive and always working hard. Especially when I sail with him, he is always working his best to fix and work with what we make and always looking to take a step forwards mentally and physically in the race. Also, one of my previous C420 coaches, Camilla Marino, is still one of my biggest role models in sailing. As a strong female sailor, she has taught me to be tough and to fight for what I want on and off the water, as well as countless valuable lessons that still run through my mind while racing. Lastly, and very importantly for me during this Worlds event, is Anna. Throughout the past few years of my life, she has been a tremendous best friend and amazing role model as I’ve watched her accomplish so much and always preserve which has truly taught me to work hard while racing and in my everyday life.

Anna, what does Kaila do best?
One of Kaila’s biggest strengths is her ability to learn from her mistakes and quickly apply corrections.  Kaila has also done amazingly well with working to learn how to power the boat to our size. We had the smallest combined weight at any 505 regatta, but she has been able to refine how we need to set up our boat. She is remarkably supportive. I occasionally get frustrated with my physical abilities while we are sailing and she is able to level my head and push me further, even when she is struggling herself.

Kaila, what does Anna do best?
Anna has a great amount of physical and mental strength which most definitely proves vital when racing the 505. Even when races are physically tough as we battle to keep the boat flat, I watch her grit her teeth, smile, and try even harder. I have certainly never met anyone so determined to do the best she can possibly do which makes working and sailing together absolutely great.

Kaila, your beat your dad Christopher, any love lost?
Disregarding any places finished, I believe both of our goals was to come to our first worlds and learn valuable lessons. We both had various ups and downs but coming out of the event, we both were proud of our races and have agreed to work even harder to improve. So in the end, as far as I know, no love was lost.

What is it like being one of the few female-only teams in the class?
The sport is known to be been dominated by males, but we see more and more females coming into the sport through high school and college sailing. It is definitely empowering to be one of the only all-female teams in the class. People are looking to the all-female teams to prove the physical ability for females to sail these powerful boats. We really want to show young women that it is possible to get into these classes and that the power of the boat is not a reason to avoid the class.

What advice would you have for other young sailors looking to get into the class?
Anna: Don’t be afraid to ask questions. This group of sailors is one of the most supportive that I have ever seen. They want to see the class build and grow and the only way to do that is to bring young people in. If you are interested in getting into the class, ask someone to take you out. I guarantee that they would be happy to see some young faces in the boat.
Kaila: To piggy-back off of Anna, this class is definitely amazing and helpful in so many ways so never be afraid to ask questions. People are always looking for interested sailors to skipper and crew. If you are excited to learn a lot in a fast paced boat this is definitely the place to be.

Do you have any events you are looking forward to next season?
Anna: Right now, we don’t have any plans. We are pretty limited in our time together. We both have taken on demanding paths in school combined with college sailing and our summers are dedicated to working to pay for school. If anyone wants to help us out, we would love to make another appearance at Worlds!
Kaila: While in Boston during the school year, I most likely will not be able to make any events due to travel expenses and time but hopefully this summer, I’ll be back racing 505’s in Hampton. We both would definitely love to travel to Poland next year for Worlds depending on funding and travel expenses, of course.

Thursday, November 2, 2017

Catching up with World Champion Mike Holt

Photograph by Christophe Favreau
Now that the dust has settled from the Worlds in Annapolis, I got a chance to catch up with the world champion himself Mike Holt, who was kind enough to answer a few questions.  Mike and Carl won with a 2- 1- [15]- 5- 3- 1- 3- [89], which was the most consistent score line of the event.  The variety of light air days and windy days made this especially impressive.  I wanted to learn more about his sailing career, and what goes into making the success he has created for himself.

Q: Congratulations on your third world championship!  How are you feeling now?
A: Thanks, it was a great feeling to win an event that no one expected us to win! To win amongst such a good group of sailors and lifelong friends was a big moment that will live will Carl and I for the rest of our lives!

Q: Who has been your inspiration?
A: So many people! Sailing 5O5’s has been such a journey and to be at the stage we are now is just incredible. When I started sailing the boat, the people to aspire to be were Peter Colclough and Krister Bergstrom and the first Worlds I did they were 1 and 2 and I thought wow, to race at that level and be match racing for a World title, how cool is that! The class has such an unbelievable history of great sailors, right from the start up to the current day, that it is continually motivating and inspiring to continue the legacy that they have built.

Q: You have been in the class for awhile now, but really stepped it up a notch over the past decade, starting with your 2nd place finish in the 2009 Worlds.  Was there a critical moment in your career where things just "clicked" for you?
A: Sailing for me has been two distinct parts, before kids, when I sailed all the time and did what I wanted to, then once the kids had grown a bit and were less dependent came the second sailing career. Back in 2008 Carl and I sat down and decided that it was time to raise our game and invest in our sailing. We decided to limit the variables, put together the best program, practice and see if we were as good as we thought we were! Put up or shut up time! At that time, we felt the best kit was a Rondar hull, M2 mast, Watertat foils (480 board) and for the SF ’09 Worlds Glaser sails. So, we got a new Rondar hull and I fitted it out with the help of Shane Illidge and straight away we were on the pace.

Having the best gear and racing for a World title (we had 2 goes at winning as with 2 races to go the worst we could finish was 2nd) against Mike and Jeff was so much fun that I think we were addicted to the thrill of competing at that level. Two years later we came even closer in Hamilton Island, coulda, shoulda… So then it became an obsession. That was fueled further by coming 4th to 3 German teams in Barbados, now it was an obsession magnified by passion!


Q: You have a strong preference to gate early at the start?  Can you explain why?
A: That is easy, if you think you are fast, you want to be leveraging your speed advantage straight away. However, we always track the wind and the discussion in the boat is, “do we want to be the rabbit?” If we do, we will start late, or at least until we feel the rabbit is headed, then we start. Otherwise, get racing and get to the first shift.

Q: Watching the video, you are a very physical sailor.  Have you always been this way?
A: Yes! Long list of crews who will complain about how hard it is to stand on the rail when I am driving. But it is condition specific, you need to go through the gears with the wind and sea state. When it is light it is a smooth, gentle touch game, that evolves as the wind increases until when it is windy it is all about keeping the boat on its feet and moving as fast as it will at all times.

Q: What type of physical and mental preparation do you do to prepare for a world championship?
A: The training is simple but hard, tons of hills on my bike, then 20 minutes a day on the rowing machine. You have to be able to race at 100% all day long. Every day. Mentally, I lie to Mike Martin about our weight… The thing is, the more time you invest and the better the results get the easier it becomes, obvious in retrospect but as the saying goes the more I practice the luckier I get.

Q: What did you do differently to prepare for this event?
A: Nothing. Every event could be any conditions, except SF, where you know it will be windy. I thought Kiel in ’14 would be light, it was windy, I thought Weymouth would be light it was generally windy, so I figured that to optimize like we did for Weymouth would turn out to be counter productive. So we just did plenty of sailing, well I did, Carl was a bit more constrained, but me, Rob/Carl did 4 weeks of events around the World before the Worlds so plenty of time sailing and really were focused on being fast regardless of the wind.

Q: What does a typical practice day look like?
A: Those are all long in the past, now it is a day or two sailing before an event if everything works out. We are lucky that on the West Coast we have Mike, Howie, Ted and many other great sailors to be pushed by, every time we go sailing and when we get to Europe we have Ian Pinnel and Andy Smith who push us. So practice is lining up before racing. Lining up and dialing in the boat speed. Test the numbers and the fastest way around the race track so that at the start gun we have a good plan in place for what we want to do. You have to use the time as effectively as you can. On a race day, get out in plenty of time, get the boat set up, learn what the wind and tide are doing, confirm your plan for the race. Execute.

Q: Carl lives on the other side of the country and you prefer to sail with him.  What does Carl do best?
A: I am super lucky, I get to sail with the two best crews in the World, Carl and Rob. The best thing is that they now have to try and out perform the other, it is a crew game of who can be the best. So they always bring their A game. But what they both do is bring an unbelievable desire to win and laser focus to achieve that goal. I have it made there!

Q: What advice would you give to your younger self?
A: Sheet in hike hard. Oh and there are no short cuts, work hard, no, work harder! But enjoy the ride.

Q: On last question.  How much for 9072?
A: $1m

Sunday, October 29, 2017

2017 505 Worlds Regatta Results

Full reports were created day-by-day for immediate release by the the worlds committee.  The complete list of official press releases is listed below.  There was no report from the final day of racing.  Mike Holt and and Carl Smit clinched the world title by the end of Day 4.

SAP 505 Worlds Day 1 Report
SAP 505 Worlds Day 2 Report
SAP 505 Worlds Day 3 Report
SAP 505 Worlds Day 4 Report


Cumulative Results


1. IO Integration, Mike Holt / Carl Smit , USA - 2 -1 -[15] -5 -3 -1 -3 -[89] ; 15
2. Mike's Boat, Mike Martin / Adam Lowry , USA - 8 -[21] -[25] -6 -2 -6 -1 -3 ; 26
3. Gill Race Team, Andy Smith / Roger Gilbert , UK - 10 -3 -6 -2 -5 -3 -[15] -[16] ; 29
4. Its Big Its White , Edward Conrads / Brian Haines , USA - 9 -6 -7 -1 -4 -[20] -6 -[12] ; 33
5. P and B Race Team, Ian Pinnell / Dave Shelton , UK - 4 -4 -8 -[21] -[10] -7 -5 -8 ; 36
6. Team Rooster, Tyler Moore / Rob Woelfel , USA - 3 -[25] -[27] -15 -6 -2 -8 -4 ; 38
7. Frozen Banana, Howard Hamlin / Andy Zinn , USA - 1 -5 -4 -[41] -8 -18 -[89] -7 ; 43
8. 8929, Kai Bertallot / Jan Reifferscheidt , GER - 15 -9 -[35] -29 -1 -4 -2 -[36] ; 60
9. Ovington Boats, Nathan Batchelor / Norman Byrd , GBR - 23 -2 -11 -4 -[27] -[32] -20 -5 ; 65
10. Bikini Atoll, Angela Stenger / Skipper: Nikola Birkner , GER - 19 -10 -1 -14 -20 -[89] -[28] -2 ; 66
11. Bessy, Christopher Segerblom / Eric Anderson , USA - [29] -8 -23 -[25] -14 -8 -7 -9 ; 69
12. License to Kill, Matthew Barry / Thomas Barrows , USA - [22] -12 -18 -19 -[24] -17 -4 -1 ; 71
13. Toxic Asset, Jesse Falsone / Chris Behm , USA - 17 -16 -3 -8 -[89] -16 -12 -[24] ; 72
14. SUP, Douglas Hagan / Shane Illidge , USA - 6 -7 -9 -9 -[38] -27 -[33] -14 ; 72
15. 505, Philippe Boite / Florian Corbel , FRA - 11 -18 -[30] -7 -13 -[19] -19 -6 ; 74
16. blue boat, Kevin Taugher / Reeve Dunn , USA - 5 -20 -19 -10 -11 -[89] -16 -[37] ; 81
17. Park Miller LLC, Stuart Park / Ryan Cox , USA - 7 -[31] -[41] -27 -9 -13 -9 -18 ; 83
18. Pressure Drop, Ethan Bixby / Parry Barclay , USA - 18 -19 -2 -22 -[36] -5 -[27] -25 ; 91
19. NESS, Drew Buttner / Mark Zagol , USA - 21 -[36] -[47] -3 -18 -26 -13 -19 ; 100
20. compensation-partner.de, Tim Boeger / Finn Boeger , GER - 14 -11 -[38] -[55] -7 -25 -11 -34 ; 102
21. Soaked, Nigel Lott / Bob Franks , AUS - 24 -14 -[31] -17 -23 -10 -23 -[89] ; 111
22. Swear jar, Malcolm Higgins / Marcus Cooper , AUS - 16 -24 -26 -[37] -[31] -23 -24 -11 ; 124
23. IBIYCYHI, A.J. Conrads / Richard Mundell , USA - 20 -28 -[43] -[39] -16 -34 -21 -10 ; 129
24. Highway 95 Revisited, Macy Nelson / Russell Miller , USA - 32 -[62] -29 -12 -15 -24 -17 -[57] ; 129
25. USA8913, Dan Herlihy / Austin Powers , USA - 12 -26 -17 -31 -[48] -[62] -22 -22 ; 130
26. USA 9005, Gordon Russell / Martin Goult , USA - [44] -35 -13 -18 -[56] -11 -26 -28 ; 131
27. bottle of red bottle of white, chris lewns / Jarrod Simpson , UK - 30 -[45] -[40] -20 -21 -9 -14 -38 ; 132
28. The Mechanic, Tudor Owen / Thomas Bruton , GBR - [41] -27 -[55] -13 -30 -22 -18 -29 ; 139
29. Magic Marine, Jens Findel / Johannes Tellen , USA - 46 -43 -12 -[89] -17 -12 -10 -[89] ; 140
30. Big Red Dog, Kerry Poe / Paul VonGrey , USA - 13 -[42] -33 -[60] -12 -33 -30 -40 ; 161
31. OCCY 2, Mark Stowell / Adam Brenz-Verca , AUS - 28 -[50] -24 -16 -28 -31 -34 -[42] ; 161
32. USA 8851, Ted Huebner / Mike Komar , USA - 27 -[47] -22 -26 -[35] -35 -35 -17 ; 162
33. Earle Grey, Earle Alexander / Ian Gregg , AUS - 25 -22 -34 -[36] -25 -29 -32 -[89] ; 167
34. Lookadatla, Peter Scannell / John Dunlea , IRL - 33 -[49] -45 -24 -29 -14 -29 -[54] ; 174
35. Swagman, Michael Coe / Ali Meller , USA - 35 -29 -28 -35 -40 -[89] -[89] -15 ; 182
36. KE ATAO IV, Herve de Kergariou / Guillaume de Kergariou , FRA - [50] -17 -20 -11 -46 -[54] -43 -50 ; 187
37. 904, Benton Amthor / Doug Amthor , USA - 31 -[89] -16 -33 -[52] -38 -42 -30 ; 190
38. FB Incognito , Tom Crawford / Pierre Jeangirard , USA - [55] -15 -[73] -32 -32 -43 -50 -26 ; 198
39. Sojourner, Lin Robson / Matthew Gardiner , USA - [57] -32 -5 -44 -51 -[72] -46 -21 ; 199
40. Boaty McBoatface, Curtis Hartmann / Michael Quirk , AUS - 39 -34 -50 -[89] -26 -15 -36 -[89] ; 200
41. More Desperate Measures, Jeff Boyd / Rachael Boyd , CAN - [60] -33 -14 -30 -42 -[51] -38 -47 ; 204
42. Tamaki, Paul Scoffin / Brendan Heussler , USA - [49] -[44] -37 -42 -22 -36 -37 -39 ; 213
43. Bench Mark, Henry Amthor / Dustin Romey , USA - 26 -[71] -52 -40 -34 -21 -41 -[58] ; 214
44. No Retreat, Dylan Breton / Matthew Breton , USA - 43 -[72] -49 -53 -19 -[71] -45 -13 ; 222
45. Hatoup, Catherine Guiader / Christopher Brady , USA - 48 -30 -53 -28 -[89] -[70] -62 -20 ; 241
46. SailingBits.com, Dean Souter / Brad Clarke , AUS - 54 -13 -21 -34 -[89] -[89] -31 -89 ; 242
47. Little Bluenose, Jesper Bülow / Søren Asboe Jørgensen , DEN - 47 -40 -[87] -[89] -37 -28 -40 -56 ; 248
48. Dr. Crash, Doug Watson / Gabriel Watson , USA - [64] -48 -10 -38 -50 -41 -[89] -62 ; 249
49. Jane's Addiction, Kelsey Averill / Michael Renda , USA - 42 -[57] -[66] -43 -43 -47 -48 -31 ; 254
50. Miami Vice, mike powell / Lee Laney , USA - 53 -[68] -[61] -45 -41 -39 -44 -41 ; 263
51. LEE Sails, Amy Lee / Justin Mulkearns , AUS - [65] -41 -42 -49 -33 -53 -49 -[63] ; 267
52. Rock Beat, Roger Deane / Nigel Deane , GBR - [73] -[70] -57 -63 -59 -30 -25 -51 ; 285
53. Blondage, Duane Delfosse / Sol Marini , USA - 62 -52 -58 -[71] -39 -[89] -39 -35 ; 285
54. Giiamari, Petri Ebeling / Antti Salonen , FIN - 40 -56 -39 -[66] -49 -36 -[89] -65 ; 285
55. The Great Pumpkin, Katherine Long / Dan Ginther , USA - 38 -38 -[67] -58 -54 -[68] -58 -48 ; 294
56. Battleship, Brendan Connell / Steve Lovshin , USA - 52 -37 -85 -50 -[89] -44 -[89] -27 ; 295
57. Serendipity, Stuart Turnbull / Andy Forman , GBR - 56 -51 -56 -[73] -47 -[69] -54 -32 ; 296
58. FIG JAM, Jake Spracher / Jay Smith , USA - [71] -54 -36 -48 -[89] -49 -65 -55 ; 307
59. 505, Marek Balinski / Barney Harris , CAN - [75] -64 -63 -65 -53 -40 -[89] -23 ; 308
60. White Wood Sailing Team, Przemek Zagorski / Michal Olko , POL - 34 -[89] -69 -47 -[71] -42 -52 -66 ; 310
61. Larissa, Georg Mittermayer / Dirk Barteldt , GER - [82] -23 -74 -[79] -55 -37 -47 -78 ; 314
62. Schneller, Kaila Pfrang / Anna Patterson , USA - 68 -59 -[76] -23 -[73] -67 -55 -44 ; 316
63. Mystery, Marie Gendron / David Brown , CAN - 58 -[76] -32 -[70] -62 -60 -56 -61 ; 329
64. Noch Schneller, Christopher Pfrang / Eric Schwab , USA - 71 -46 -77 -52 -[89] -52 -[89] -33 ; 331
65. 8937, Tim Murphy / Matt Merchant , USA - 51 -[67] -[71] -64 -61 -46 -61 -53 ; 336
66. Devils Haircut, matt Hansen / Crazy John McLean , AUS - [81] -61 -59 -68 -44 -48 -57 -[79] ; 337
67. Yes Dear!, Anne Fitzpatrick / Christian Pittack , USA - 37 -[89] -60 -[77] -45 -58 -89 -49 ; 338
68. 8194, Clark Hayes / Clayton James , USA - 36 -[75] -64 -[69] -65 -63 -59 -52 ; 339
69. Yabsta, Gary Taylor / Brett Wright , BER - 59 -53 -46 -59 -[70] -64 -[71] -59 ; 340
70. FRA 9086, Neidhart Elisabeth / David De Monteil , FRA - 45 -55 -51 -46 -[89] -[89] -89 -60 ; 346
71. Eighteen, Brett Bowden / Arielle Darrow , AUS - [69] -65 -[80] -54 -64 -61 -63 -43 ; 350
72. Red Rocket, Shona Moss Lovshin / Devlin Lovshin , CAN - 79 -60 -54 -61 -57 -[89] -[89] -45 ; 356
73. Team Trouble, Sterling Spruill / Steve Taylor , USA - 70 -[74] -[79] -67 -63 -45 -53 -64 ; 362
74. Poly Styrene, Michael Parramore / Marco Giraldi , USA - 66 -58 -44 -[75] -68 -59 -69 -[71] ; 364
75. Send it!, Paul Place / Nicolas Tosi , CAN - [77] -69 -[78] -56 -70 -66 -66 -46 ; 373
76. Red Baron, Richard Hyde / Lindsay Hyde , AUS - 63 -[73] -72 -[74] -60 -50 -60 -68 ; 373
77. Ultravires, Jim McGillivray / Ian Wilson , UK - 72 -63 -65 -[76] -69 -57 -51 -[73] ; 377
78. Safety Word, Bryan Richardson / Ashley Love , USA - [89] -39 -48 -51 -[89] -89 -89 -67 ; 383
79. The Shocker, Ian Conners / Jimmie Cockerill , USA - 61 -[79] -68 -72 -[89] -55 -72 -69 ; 397
80. Applesap, Shiro Noguchi / Takao Fijita , JPN - 76 -66 -[89] -62 -67 -[89] -64 -75 ; 410
81. Kryptonite, Brian Trainor / Mike Poulos , CAN - 78 -77 -[81] -[81] -58 -56 -68 -74 ; 411
82. Wicked Pissa, David Burchfiel / Bob Williams , USA - [84] -82 -62 -80 -[89] -65 -67 -70 ; 426
83. 505, Patrick Mcgale / langdon junge , GBR - 74 -80 -70 -57 -75 -[89] -[89] -77 ; 433
84. Hodor, Paul Andron / Chris Drury , USA - [86] -84 -84 -84 -[89] -73 -70 -72 ; 467
85. A Salt Weapon, John Macarthur-King / Sarah Macarthur-King , AUS - 85 -78 -75 -82 -72 -[89] -[89] -76 ; 468
86. Matilda, David Neal , USA - 80 -81 -[82] -78 -75 -[89] -73 -81 ; 468
87. Covfefe, Eric Konieczynski / Kyra Tallon , USA - 83 -83 -83 -83 -[89] -[89] -89 -89 ; 510

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Thursday, June 22, 2017

2017 North Americans Regatta Report - by Drew Buttner and Craig Thompson

The 2017 505 North American Championship was contested over four June days on the beautiful Buzzards Bay in Massachusetts. The event was hosted by the Community Boating Center in New Bedford, and all the competitors left with big smiles on their faces as the venue, the race management, the social schedule, and the bay delivered.

Historic Fort Taber
 25 teams made historic Fort Taber their home base for the long weekend, which meant a short 15 minute sail to the starting line. Situated on the lee side of a point at the base of the sea breeze, Fort Taber offered an ideal location to launch from. The New Bedford Whaling Museum hosted everyone Thursday night and gave everyone a look back into the 1900's whaling community. Racing during the event was spectacular with four very different days.

Fleet on the second reach leg of a Worlds Course, Day 1
Day 1 was champagne sailing with 12-15 knots and sunny skies.  A mixture of 505 worlds courses (W/L, Triangle, W/L) and double W/L courses were sailed throughout the regatta. Races were generally 50-70 minutes long allowing for sufficient time to pass and to be passed; many races were decided on the last downwind leg which provided adequate passing lanes. 3 races were held with Howie Hamlin and Andy Zinn asserting their early dominace on the fleet. Craig Thompson and Mike Curtin put together a solid first day to hold 2nd place going into day 2.

Hamlin and Zinn finish close in front of Thompson and Curtin in Race 3
Day 2 brought 20-25 knots and enormous waves launching many 505s into the air exposing both blades as they skipped over the waves upwind. Two races were held with the wind opposing the tide, until the breeze freshend further turing the sail back to the fort into a true test of seamanship. The volunteers and the CBC staff did a fantastic job on the water ensuring all boats, including those that had equipment damage, made it safely back to shore. Howie and Andy and Ted Conrads and Jeff Nelson both set themselves apart from the fleet in the big breeze, with finishes of 2-1 and a 1-3 respectively.

Conrads and Nelson proved fast and proficient in big breeze and big waves

Kivney and Russell getting some air time around the top mark

Barry and Barrowes had great speed on day 2

Hamlin and Zinn approaching the finish at speed
Day 3 was a light 5-7 knots, with two races held after a postponement on shore. Chris Behn and Jesse Falsone put together a solid day with two third place finishes putting them in striking distance of the top three going into the final day.

Day 3 was a much different condition, testing the sailor's all-around skills

Behm and Falsone proved to be quick in the light air
Day 4 saw 10-15 knots with heavy fog. two races were held in a tricky condition with large disparity between the puffs and the lulls. Limited visibiity also made for some interesting strategy in deciding which side of the course to favor. 505 newcomer Chris Segerblom and Eric Anderson won the day with finishes of 3-1 securing their 8th place overall and the "top young team" award of a brand new jib donated by North Sails. While the winners of the event had already been determined, the fight for second place came down to the last run of the regatta. Thompson and Curtin rounded the last top mark in 3rd place, but opted for a standard set onto starboard. Behm and Falsone gybe-set onto what proved to be the heavily favored side of the course downwind and had a great run to finish 4th in the race and secure 2nd place overall. Conrads and Nelson finished out 1 point back in third overall.

From left to right: Andy Herlihy (regatta chair), Andy Zinn, Howie Hamlin, Sam Vineyard (PRO)

Top young team Eric Anderson and Chris Segerblom

Third place team of Ted Conrads and Jeff Nelson

Second place team of Jesse Falsone and Chris Behm
The race management lead by Sam Vineyard handled the changing conditions perfectly. In the end, the team of Howie and Andy proved to be faster, smarter, and more consistent than the balance of the fleet and were crowned the 2017 505 North American Champions. Howie and Andy have won 3 of the last 4 North Americans and are certainly looking like strong contenders going into the Annapolis Worlds in September.

All photos courtesy of C A Hill Photo. Full gallery of photos can be found here.

Full Results:

Place, Skipper, Crew City, State, Country, Results, Total Points
1. Howard Hamlin, Andy Zinn , Long Beach, CA, USA, 1 -1 -2 -2 -1 -1 -4 -1 -[5] ; 13
2. Chris Behm, Jesse Falsone , Edgewater, MD, USA, 3 -5 -11 -5 -[14] -3 -3 -4 -4 ; 38
3. Ted Conrads, Jeff Nelson , Mill Valley, CA, USA, 5 -4 -12 -1 -3 -4 -1 -9 -[13] ; 39
4. Craig Thompson, Mike Curtin , Rye, NH, USA, 4 -2 -3 -6 -7 -2 -[10] -8 -8 ; 40
5. Tyler Moore , Rob Woelfel, Hampton, VA, USA, [26] -11 -4 -3 -8 -6 -2 -2 -6 ; 42
6. Michael Quirk, Curtis Hartmann , Kensington, MD, USA, [10] -3 -8 -4 -2 -5 -8 -7 -10 ; 47
7. Mark Zagol, Drew Buttner , Westwood, MA, USA, 7 -7 -1 -[16] -12 -8 -15 -5 -3 ; 58
8. Chris Segerblom, Eric Anderson , Mountain View, CA, USA, 9 -10 -[13] -11 -4 -9 -13 -3 -1 ; 60
9. Henry Amthor, Reeve Dunne , Hampton, VA, USA, [16] -13 -10 -8 -9 -7 -7 -6 -2 ; 62
10. Matthew Barry, Thomas Barrows , New York, NY, USA, 2 -6 -6 -10 -6 -10 -6 -17 -[18] ; 63
11. Macy Nelson, Russell Miller , Baltimore, MD, USA, 6 -9 -5 -15 -[26] -16 -5 -10 -9 ; 75
12. Thomas Kivney, Gordon Russell , .Williamstown, MA, USA, 8 -8 -9 -9 -5 -19 -[22] -12 -11 ; 81
13. Michael Komar, John Ingalls , Newport, RI, USA, 11 -17 -15 -7 -[26] -15 -9 -11 -12 ; 97
14. Lin Robson, Unknown , St. Petersburg Beach, FL, USA, 17 -12 -7 -17 -11 -18 -14 -[20] -19 ; 115
15. Barney Harris, Unknown , arlington, va, USA, 19 -14 -[20] -12 -10 -20 -16 -15 -17 ; 123
16. Duane Delfosse, Stuart Park , Windham, NH, USA, 12 -19 -14 -[26] -26 -12 -17 -14 -14 ; 128
17. Dan Herlihy, Jay Smith , Richmond, VA, USA, 13 -16 -[26] -26 -26 -13 -12 -16 -15 ; 137
18. Peter Scannell, Tom Hurwitch , Saratoga Springs, NY, USA, [26] -26 -26 -13 -13 -22 -19 -13 -7 ; 139
19. Catherine Guiader, Chris Brady , Annapolis, MD, USA, 18 -20 -18 -[26] -26 -11 -11 -18 -20 ; 142
20. Marek Balinski, Unknown , Toronto, Ont, CAN, 21 -21 -16 -14 -[26] -14 -21 -21 -21 ; 149
21. Doug Watson, Gabe Watson , Baltimore, MD, USA, 14 -18 -21 -[26] -26 -21 -20 -19 -16 ; 155
22. Marie Gendron, Unknown , St-Zotique, Quebec, CAN, 20 -22 -19 -[26] -26 -17 -18 -22 -26 ; 170
23. Michael Breton, Unknown , Charlestown, RI, USA, 15 -15 -17 -[26] -26 -26 -26 -26 -26 ; 177
24. Bill Platt, Unknown , Madison, CT, USA, [26] -26 -26 -26 -26 -26 -26 -26 -26 ; 208
25. Mike Martin, Adam Lowry , Mill Valley, CA, USA, [26] -26 -26 -26 -26 -26 -26 -26 -26 ; 208